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Zillow buys Trulia for $3.5 billion
zillow trulia buyout
NEW YORK (CNNMoney)

The two biggest names in online house hunting -- Zillow and Trulia - are joining forces in a stock deal valued at $3.5 billion.

Trulia shares jumped 12% on the news that it's selling to Zillow.

Zillow will continue to operate two separate websites, where consumers can search listings of homes for sale. Zillow and Trulia together attract more than 130 million visitors a month.

Both companies post detailed listings of homes for sale, and charge agents to post their names alongside their listings. Some agent teams spend $20,000 a month with Zillow, Trulia, or both.

Still the websites' revenue only add up to about 4% of the $12 billion the real estate industry spends on marketing via newspaper and television ads, billboards, direct mail and the like. Zillow CEO Spencer Rascoff sees an opportunity to capture more of those marketing dollars via mobile.

"Mobile is becoming the medium of choice for home shopping," said Rascoff.

Trulia's current CEO Pete Flint will continue to head Trulia's operations and report to Rascoff.

The two real estate portals have transformed the housing market over the past decade by making information that was once only available through realtors easily accessible to consumers. The sites have made the home buying process much more transparent and stripped real estate brokers of their traditional role of gatekeepers of information.

Related: Chinese homebuyers are flocking to these states

Zillow, for instance, has its own home value algorithm called Zestimates. Trulia offers extensive rankings on crime, public transit and schools.

The ultimate fear: Zillow and Trulia could make brokers irrelevant.

The new Zillow will still have plenty of competition from other sites such as Realtor.com, Homes.com as well as from Coldwell Banker, Re/Max, Century 21 and other real estate brokers.

But it will give the combined company the leverage to charge realtors more, said Steve Murray, editor at Real Trends a real estate communications and consulting company.



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What it really takes to be a great boss
good boss
NEW YORK (CNNMoney)

For many, having a truly great boss is the exception rather than the rule.

That's because being one takes a seriously deft touch. You have to inspire people to succeed and give them the tools they need - all while meeting company dictates.

Most of us assess how great a boss is by how he or she manages employees.

But in order to manage employees really well, a leader actually needs to master two other things first, said Harvard Business School Professor Linda Hill, the coauthor of two leadership books, "Being the Boss" and "Collective Genius."

One, Hill said, is to develop self-awareness, to know how others feel when they're with you. Are they scared of you? Do they trust you? Do they feel you trust them?

"It's always about the emotional connection," she said. "Being scared around you doesn't lead to your being respected."

The second is to successfully manage your network of colleagues and bosses over whom you have no authority but whose support you and your team will need to excel.

Quiz: Do you have what it takes to be a great boss?

Think about it this way: Even if your employees love you, they'll become very frustrated if you're powerless to sell their ideas up the food chain.

CNNMoney asked readers to weigh in on what they think characterizes the best bosses. Three traits came up again and again in their comments.

Great leaders, they said:

1) Respect and appreciate their employees

They respect what you do, they respect your expertise and they respect the fact that you may have your own work style.

"Great bosses earn respect by giving respect," said one reader.

Bosses who say "thank you" came up a lot, too, as did bosses who publicly give credit where it's due, who welcome employees' input and feedback, and who recognize that employees are humans, not just "resources," as another reader put it.

2) Create trust and support

An excellent boss trusts you to do your job, has faith in your team, encourages your success, goes to bat for you and is always approachable.

"I would gladly follow [a wonderful boss] to another company if they left because working for them is a great experience. And you want to take on new challenges and risk because you know they have your back," said Colin Adams of Somerville, Mass.

Great bosses are also consistently ethical and fair, and they hire good people, readers said.

3) Give employees the backing and resources to do their jobs

A great boss provides clear guidance, coaching and structure but also the leeway to develop a sense ownership over your work.

Related: 6 truly rotten bosses: You know the type

And when something goes wrong, readers said, great bosses assess what happened and help you fix the situation rather than assign blame.

"[They'll] allow you to make mistakes and learn from those mistakes without throwing you under the bus," said Jim Langseth of Minnetrista, Minn.

Indeed, in her research, Hill found that people consistently said their best bosses were demanding but also extremely generous in terms of giving them the space to show their talents and giving them the benefit of the doubt when something goes wrong.


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Would-be giant in online house hunting has brokers scared
zillow trulia buyout
NEW YORK (CNNMoney)

The two biggest names in online house hunting -- Zillow and Trulia -- may be teaming up, a pairing that is making some real estate brokers nervous.

The rumored deal -- the companies won't confirm it -- sent the companies' stocks soaring Friday as the chatter gathered steam.

The companies don't charge for publishing these listings of homes for sale, but they do charge real estate agents fees to appear on their listing pages.

Should the two sites merge, they could have the leverage to charge more, said Steve Murray, editor at Real Trends a real estate communications and consulting company.

Already, some agent teams spend $20,000 a month with Zillow, Trulia, or both, said Murray.

For now, the agents are generally satisfied with the fees because the exposure generates so much business. Zillow and Trulia together attract 130 million visitors a month.

The ultimate fear: Zillow and Trulia could make brokers irrelevant.

Zillow, for instance, has its own home value algorithm called Zestimates. Trulia offers extensive rankings on crime, public transit and schools.

"Combined, [Zillow and Trulia] could further erode the leadership of the National Association of Realtors," said Jonathan Miller, president of Miller Samuel, a New York based appraisal firm.

Related: 10 mansions for under $1 million

Related: Best places for vacation home deals



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